Authority of Third Party Source

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Identification

This is the most common form, wherein an authority is cited to persuade. It is a very strong tactic, as it represents the “absolute truth” according to the source cited, especially if they are perceived as the ultimate authority. Or does it? This is the bread and butter of media of all types, where the author furthers their argument by propositions applied to situations and supported by a source. These three things must be present to truly persuade: an applicable proposition, applied to a similar situation, and a credible source. When basic authority is used against you, you can attack the referenced proposition, discredit the source, or change the frame of reference.This is the most common form, wherein an authority is cited to persuade. It is a very strong tactic, as it represents the “absolute truth” according to the source cited, especially if they are perceived as the ultimate authority. Or does it? This is the bread and butter of media of all types, where the author furthers their argument by propositions applied to situations and supported by a source. These three things must be present to truly persuade: an applicable proposition, applied to a similar situation, and a credible source. When basic authority is used against you, you can attack the referenced proposition, discredit the source, or change the frame of reference.This is the most common form, wherein an authority is cited to persuade. It is a very strong tactic, as it represents the “absolute truth” according to the source cited, especially if they are perceived as the ultimate authority. Or does it? This is the bread and butter of media of all types, where the author furthers their argument by propositions applied to situations and supported by a source. These three things must be present to truly persuade: an applicable proposition, applied to a similar situation, and a credible source. When basic authority is used against you, you can attack the referenced proposition, discredit the source, or change the frame of reference.This is the most common form, wherein an authority is cited to persuade. It is a very strong tactic, as it represents the “absolute truth” according to the source cited, especially if they are perceived as the ultimate authority. Or does it? This is the bread and butter of media of all types, where the author furthers their argument by propositions applied to situations and supported by a source. These three things must be present to truly persuade: an applicable proposition, applied to a similar situation, and a credible source. When basic authority is used against you, you can attack the referenced proposition, discredit the source, or change the frame of reference.This is the most common form, wherein an authority is cited to persuade. It is a very strong tactic, as it represents the “absolute truth” according to the source cited, especially if they are perceived as the ultimate authority. Or does it? This is the bread and butter of media of all types, where the author furthers their argument by propositions applied to situations and supported by a source. These three things must be present to truly persuade: an applicable proposition, applied to a similar situation, and a credible source. When basic authority is used against you, you can attack the referenced proposition, discredit the source, or change the frame of reference.This is the most common form, wherein an authority is cited to persuade. It is a very strong tactic, as it represents the “absolute truth” according to the source cited, especially if they are perceived as the ultimate authority. Or does it? This is the bread and butter of media of all types, where the author furthers their argument by propositions applied to situations and supported by a source. These three things must be present to truly persuade: an applicable proposition, applied to a similar situation, and a credible source. When basic authority is used against you, you can attack the referenced proposition, discredit the source, or change the frame of reference.This is the most common form, wherein an authority is cited to persuade. It is a very strong tactic, as it represents the “absolute truth” according to the source cited, especially if they are perceived as the ultimate authority. Or does it? This is the bread and butter of media of all types, where the author furthers their argument by propositions applied to situations and supported by a source. These three things must be present to truly persuade: an applicable proposition, applied to a similar situation, and a credible source. When basic authority is used against you, you can attack the referenced proposition, discredit the source, or change the frame of reference.This is the most common form, wherein an authority is cited to persuade. It is a very strong tactic, as it represents the “absolute truth” according to the source cited, especially if they are perceived as the ultimate authority. Or does it? This is the bread and butter of media of all types, where the author furthers their argument by propositions applied to situations and supported by a source. These three things must be present to truly persuade: an applicable proposition, applied to a similar situation, and a credible source. When basic authority is used against you, you can attack the referenced proposition, discredit the source, or change the frame of reference.This is the most common form, wherein an authority is cited to persuade. It is a very strong tactic, as it represents the “absolute truth” according to the source cited, especially if they are perceived as the ultimate authority. Or does it? This is the bread and butter of media of all types, where the author furthers their argument by propositions applied to situations and supported by a source. These three things must be present to truly persuade: an applicable proposition, applied to a similar situation, and a credible source. When basic authority is used against you, you can attack the referenced proposition, discredit the source, or change the frame of reference.

Example

Consider a commodities transaction: Negotiator 1 (Goal = Premium): “The cost for my Kumquats is $3 per pound.” Negotiator 2 (Goal = Market Price): “I heard on National Public Radio that the average price for kumquats is $1 per pound due to a glut from a bumper crop in Capistrano.” (Authority of Third Party Source) Negotiator 1, Defense 1: Change the Reference Frame: “I am not in Capistrano. I am buying local and markets are dynamic. I am part of the new ‘buy local’ market and you have lower shipping costs.” Negotiator 1, Defense 2: Attack Authority: “I listened to the same broadcast and at the start they disclosed that one of their largest donors was the American Kumquat Council, so I take that ‘market price’ with a grain of salt.” Negotiator 1, Defense 2: Attack Authority: “I listened to the same broadcast and at the start they disclosed that one of their largest donors was the American Kumquat Council, so I take that ‘market price’ with a grain of salt.”

Solution

There are multiple ways to defend, but most attack the veracity of the source or change the reference. Changing the reference can also be a means of distinguishing – pointing out the differences from the position suggested and the actual position you are negotiating.

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